MY SUPERPOWER IS SOCIOLOGY, WHAT’S YOURS?

 

*** Originally Published on Engaged Sociology by IUP Department of Sociology***

INTRODUCTION

What does it mean to be a sociologist? This is a question that I have spent the last seven years of my life trying to answer. We know how to define sociology; but what does it mean to be a sociologist? Here is my take on this question. Being a sociologist is in many ways like being a superhero. Everyone who comes into the field has an origin story of how they became a sociologist (or a sociology major). They have experiences that acted as a calling to this field, and that act as a motivation or a drive which allows them to do the work that they do. Also, everyone in the field has unique skill sets, which are kind of like superpowers, that allow them to tackle pressing social issues present in society.

Although sociologists, like superheroes, are unique in many aspects, one way in which they are all alike is how they discover and present information about social phenomena. The primary way that sociologists communicate about the world is through the research process. Constructing a research project at first can seem like a rather daunting task, especially to an undergraduate student who has never done something like this before. But, it is something that can be accomplished with ease (well, hard work). In this paper, I discuss my own origin story that explores not only how I became a sociologist but also how I found a passion for research. I then talk about how I used that passion to create and develop my own original research project that I presented and refined until I reached a thesis topic for my master’s program.

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Physical Health VS Mental Health

Mental Health is “a state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and can contribute to his or her community” (WHO, 2001). Mental Health is made up of three components which include: emotional well-being, psychological well-being, and social well-being (CDC, 2013). Mental Health is an essential part of our lives, and just like we exercise to maintain our physical health, we must practice different strategies to maintain and strengthen our mental health. The problem with sustaining and improving our mental health is that starting when we are young we are socialized to believe that mental illness and emotional health are undervalued forms of illness. Individuals who have mental illness face the stigmas associated with receiving a diagnosis, which impacts their decision to seek out treatments. For some reason as humans, it is easier for us to accept that our bodies can be hurt than it is to think about our brains and our minds falling ill. The reality is though that the brain is an organ just like any other organ in your body and it can become sick. So How do we prevent our brains from becoming sick? What can we do to change the way society views mental illness and emotional health?

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